Nidi (Nests)

Nidi (Nests)

Apr
15

Sissi Nidi (Nests), 2019 18kt gold thread ring with rubies, sapphires, emeralds, and diamonds 4.2 x 4.2 cm circa Unique Nidi (Nests) is a project inspired by the idea of a safe place, these wearable sculptures like the natural nests, embrace the life and the body of the wearer. Manual ability is central in Sissi’s work: she delicately intertwines and welds gold and silver threads with coloured stones to make a new skin that represents an extension between her work and her body in the space. In the artist’s practice, everything starts from a small element that grows and develops in different forms. This flow take shape from the soul of the artist and is articulated from the body with a potentially infinite form.

Bracelet

Apr
01

Sophie Whettnall Bracelet, 2019 18kt yellow satin gold bracelet 5cm (H) Edition of 6 Signed and numbered “I had never designed jewelry before, nor had the idea of doing it ever crossed my mind. But when a friend asked if I’d be interested, I immediately said yes. My points of reference were very personal: I wanted to design something that I could see myself wearing, and something that would have a continuity with my work as an artist. That meant that there would have to be holes; recently, I have been particularly fascinated by the texture created through drilling. And there would have to be folds or curves, because they are elegant and mysterious: what’s on the other side? These two considerations led me to think of the bracelet and ring: flat surfaces that would become textured through drilling and voluminous through folding. Surprisingly, pretty much the first sketches I made felt right, and I resisted every impulse to tinker with them.” – Sophie Whettnall

Carrying Memory ring

Nov
09

Chiharu Shiota Carrying Memory, 2018 18kt gold ring 4 x 10 cm Unique within an edition of 8 + 2AP Signed Through the use of 18kt gold, Chiharu Shiota intricately intertwines and folds threads which gradually expand into the universe, becoming an extension of the body in space. The ring that can also be used as a pendant, has been conceived and perceived in the same way as Shiota’s thread installations in which she integrates meaningful object related to everyday life. The traces left behind by a human life are also conceptually explored in the ring/pendant, which is made entirely of golden webbed threads to symbolise the inside of a human body.  

ring band spheres in yellow gold

Sep
24

Pol Bury Ring band spheres in yellow gold, 2001 18kt yellow gold ring 8 ex + IV EA 2.4 (W) cm Marylart Edition   Pol Bury emphasizes movement as an essential element of sculpture, stressing that his works are not complete until they are set into motion. Working with stainless and Cor-Ten steel, he produced monumental balls that spin or roll, columns that rotate, and planes that slope, all operated by concealed manual mechanisms. The movement that he assigns to these sculptures is often a slow, imperceptible action that does not immediately register in the viewer’s eye. These jewellery pieces are only completed once worn, as the movement of the hand triggers the motion of the elements.

SUGAR RING

Sep
14

Meret Oppenheim Sugar ring, designed in 1936, executed in 2014  Silver gold plated ring with sugar and white marble 3.4 x 2.5 x 2 cm Numbered Gems and Ladders edition ‘I love natural materials. But everything man makes is nature, even plastic, even the atomic bomb,’ Meret Oppenheim observed in an interview with Valie Export in 1975. The sugar ring, which Meret Oppenheim designed in the mid-1930s, is an absurd and delightful combination of artifice and so-called nature, of opulent and cheap materials. The throwaway and frangible sugar cube is elevated to the status of a lasting, precious stone; an edible material is made wearable. At any time the wearer can exchange the cube for a fresh ‘jewel’. Courtesy of the Artist and Gems and Ladders  

UNTITLED

Sep
13

Carol Bove Untitled, 2016 Blackened aluminium, silver earrings 8.5 cm Edition of 25 Gems and Ladders edition With these earrings, Carol Bove recreates the four light fittings that hang outside the David H. Koch Theater in New York. The building was originally called the New York State Theater; it was built as part of New York State’s participation in the 1964–65 World’s Fair and is owned by the City of New York. The building’s architect was Philip Johnson, who united neoclassicism and modernism and was famously inspired by Mies van der Rohe. Courtesy of the Artist and Gems and Ladders

GODDESS MINAUDIERE

Jun
06

Michele Oka Doner Goddess Minaudiere, 2007 Sterling silver clutch 15.2 x 17.8 x 5.1 cm Edition of 8 + AP  

Head Between Hand

Apr
24

Francesco Arena Head Between Hand, 2018 18kt yellow gold earrings Edition of 10 Signed and numbered Head between Hand is the first wearable art project created by Francesco Arena. The two earrings are cast of the artist’s thumb and little finger. A new born baby typically expands his hand with the aim to grab anything that surrounds him. This gesture symbolises his will to live and experience what is around him. This gesture has not changed for the artist, not even in his adult age, as he keeps on opening his hand to grasp what he wants and what he needs. Thumb and little finger get apart from each other to greet or to intimidate, to touch or to grab. The two artist’s fingers will hold the wearer’s head who will keep on bringing the artist’s hand around to experience anything the wearer lives.

Fossil Necklace

Apr
06

Liliane Lijn Fossil Necklace, 2008 Silver sulphur, silver matt necklace 70cm long Edition of 8 + 2AP

Pommes de Jong

Jun
16

  Jacqueline De Jong Pommes de Jong, 2017 Shrunk potato 18kt yellow gold plated cufflinks 2.8 x 1.5; 1.8 x 1.4 cm Unique ref. C5 Pommes de Jong is an ongoing project that came to life in 2007 in Bouan (Bourbonnais, France) where in the mid 1990’s de Jong and her husband decided to buy a house. She created a vegetable garden and they planted potatoes in memory of the lack of food during the war. De Jong stored the potatoes in a 13th Century cellar and suddenly realized that she was fascinated by the huge amount of sprouts that were growing from the shrunk tubers. When de Jong was asked by a jewellery collector to make a jewel for her, she thought that she might do something with these shrunk potatoes and their sprouts that were getting longer and longer. Pommes de Jong were inspired by the idea of transforming a humble object into a precious one. In the realization of the wearable art, the potatoes and their sprouts are dried slowly by the artist over a period of two years and are submerged in a bath of platinum or gold becoming exclusive pieces of wearable art.